Written by: Zach Watson


The word “entrepreneur” may have French origins, but it also has deep roots in America’s business traditions. It’s fitting then that social media, a technology of American invention, has given entrepreneurs an unprecedented platform to advertise their business and share their ideas.

Yet, taking advantage of this opportunity isn’t always straightforward. It’s often easy to speak enthusiastically about an idea in private conversation or over a whiteboard, but when it’s time to promote the endeavor on social, uncertainty creeps in.

How can you be sure your network wants to hear about your business? What type of content will be most effective? How do you find the right voice for your business on social?

At JumpCrew, we hear these questions all the time. The truth is that if a business’s content lacks conviction, it’s sure to fail. All those cute puppy photos and exotic travel videos are stiff competition, and if you’re too timid, you won’t be able to grab anyone’s attention.

The good news is there’s a method for overcoming social marketing anxiety. It goes like this:

Remember Why You Started

Shyness about advertising your business or idea on social media is driven by fear of rejection. This is completely natural. No one wants to have their idea shot down or ignored.

However, the reality of being an entrepreneur means you’re going to face adversity – whether that’s moving past your apprehension about going social or creating a business plan for investors.

In these moments, reflect on why your started this venture in the first place. What made you believe in this idea? Use that spark – that original confidence – to carry you through the tough times. This is the most difficult part of this method, for it relies solely on your mentality.

Remember: studies have shown that grit is the personality trait most closely correlated with professional success, so if your idea is going to take off, you’re going to need some mental fortitude.

Research What Other Brands Have Done Online

Once you’re in the right frame of mind, it’s time to decide what, specifically, to post. This problem can easily be solved with a little research.

Just look around at what some of the professionals you admire are posting. Even if they aren’t working in the same niche as you, it’s tremendously useful to observe what other people are using to drive results.

By observing the success of others, you can use data to inform your content strategy instead of starting from scratch. This tactic will give you a great deal of confidence in your social marketing, because you’re taking ideas that have already worked for others and using them for your business.

Keep It Personal

We’re often counseled to separate our work and personal life, but social media has blurred the lines between who we are at work and who we are in our leisure time. When you’re introducing your new venture to social media, it’s beneficial to blend your marketing content with more casual posts.

I know it sounds counterintuitive, but consider this: no one wants you to do a 180 degree turn and completely change who you are on social.

At the start, your personal network, the people who support you the most, will care about your enterprise because it’s something that you’re doing.

Even when you’re more established, people will want to engage with stories about other people. That means the behind-the-scenes moments will always resonate, because they create an emotional connection with your audience.

The caveat here is that you should always use good judgement. Rants of any kind are never a good idea.

Stay Consistent

Above all, stay consistent with your social marketing strategy. If you go silent for a couple of weeks, your network won’t know what to expect from you. At the start, things might be slow, but continuity is the key to building a foundation.

It’s natural to feel a certain amount of anxiety when you’re introducing a new idea to your social network, but having a plan is intrinsically tied to success. Be bold, use the tactics I’ve described, and feel secure in the knowledge that you can succeed.